Friday, December 11, 2009

Aureate



aureate \ˈor-ē-ət\ adjective: 1. of a golden color or brilliance {aureate light},
2. marked by grandiloquent and rhetorical style {aureate diction}

Etymology: Middle English aureat, from Medieval Latin aureatus decorated with gold, from Latin aureus

Can you compose a sentence in which aureate appears only once but where both definitions make sense?

2 comments:

Vicki Peter said...

You mean without using zeugma? Dhurr...

"The aureate letters of the Sinaia plates baffled linguists and their three-year-old daughters alike."

Okay, that was kind of weak and I'll admit Googling "texts written in gold." xP But it would be such a pretty double-meaning if done correctly...

Greg said...

The rhetor's aureate speech dazzled his erudite audience.